English Teachers of My Youth: Mrs. Carter

10th grade: Mrs. Carter.

I did not like Mrs. Carter. This is important, because she was the first English teacher I decided I didn’t really care for. It wasn’t because she wasn’t good. She cared about us tremendously, employed creative means to educate us, and was always positive. But it’s important for me to know why.
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On Saying Farewell to Students

When you teach, you reach a point at the end of the year where a blend of emotions trespass upon you and take you hostage. You are pleased to complete another year, excited at the prospects of next year’s plans, relieved that you survived various mishaps, afraid of what trials await you the following year, regretful of your mistakes, proud of the students you see moving on to their next adventures, mournful of the ones you will miss the most, tickled by the appreciation they have shown (well, some of them), but sometimes mostly empty—empty because that is your room at the end of the last day, your room for the entire summer. Continue reading

Tree Shaker: Nelson Mandela Biography Open Response for English Teachers

Nelson Mandela passed away on December 5 of this year.  It was around this time of year a year ago that I read a biography of his, Tree Shaker, by Bill Keller.  I read this book in order to create a sample assessment for students.

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How Students Can Use Weebly With The Canterbury Tales

How Students Can Use Weebly With The Canterbury Tales

When my students read The Canterbury Tales, I didn’t want to tediously read through all of the characters with them.  They wouldn’t remember all of the characters that way, and it would only serve to make it less interesting to the average high school student.  So I had a plan.
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Swords into Ploughshares: Voluntary Disarmament in the Kingdom

So I think now is the time to talk about guns.  Now that all the fuss has died down.

I get it: Letting a flooded market of guns just saturate our culture so that people will be too afraid to shoot each other instead of anxious to shoot each other  is naive.

I get it: Trying to ban all guns will just take guns away from law-abiding citizens and keep them in the hands of law-breakers and a sporadically tyrannical government, which makes it also naive.
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