7 Habits of Highly Effective Christians

The first time I ever preached a sermon I might have plagiarized Steven Covey. At least, I know that I referenced him and told everyone my sermon was going to be based on his spin-off book, Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens. I think I was a freshman in high school, had been raised a Christian, and had been baptized for three years. When the opportunity came to preach a sermon, I didn’t know where to start, so I got the idea to put my own spin on Steven Covey:5511081547_bacc35bf7b_b Continue reading

A Comprehensive Plan for Reducing Gun-Violence in America

We’re talking about it. Here’s an outline for a comprehensive plan that involves everyone doing their part. Sure, some of it may be naive, and almost none of it was my idea. But hear me out. Here’s what I think everyone can do to reduce gun violence nation-wide. Help me tweak this. Let’s crowdsource it. If the feedback is supportive enough, we just might send this suggestion on to politicians, pundits, preachers, parents, and peew-peew peddlers.

We can call it The Ballistic Pruning Accord

[Note: All listed measures are assumed to be taken voluntarily, except those taken by government authorities. In addition, this list does not include measures already taken in most areas, such as intruder drills and locked-door policies in public schools.] Continue reading

The Year’s Hit Posts in 2017

A look back on the previous year, and here are some of the top hit posts:

Cormac McCarthy Narrates Minecraft
famed author of No Country For Old Men reviews the game

Why the Civil War Happened
an in-depth analysis

Will the Religious Right Wake Up on the Right Side of the Bed?
an op-ed in the Warblr Continue reading

Self Esteem: What Matt Walsh Gets Wrong and Why It Matters

Last week Christian conservative blogger Matt Walsh, who writes for The Blaze, published a video for PragerU, titled “Why Self-Esteem is Self-Defeating.”

Walsh’s argument in the video is that teaching people to have self-esteem is a fantasy that does more harm than good. He makes several good points, but falls short of applying them appropriately.
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Taking A Course

I was never really fond of the word “class” in referring to being enrolled in a series of lessons. It’s seemed a bland, confusing word. The word comes from the Latin word classis, meaning a division of people, which is why we use the word to refer to groups of students as well as groups of people based, sort of, on income. It’s also why we use it as a noun to refer to someone as “having class” (meaning, we assume, high class). Continue reading

5 Questions for Mike Rugnetta about the Genesis Creation Story

I’ve followed and appreciated from “day 1” what Crash Course has done to educate people. Anyone with neutral net access can get entertaining, thought-provoking introductions to various subjects, getting a quick survey of topics.

The downside, of course, is that these speedy courses can reduce or misrepresent complex and nuanced understandings of the world.
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