Farewell, Union

Ron Paul’s farewell address to Congress is the best “State of the Union” address I have ever heard from an American politician.  Some of the wisest words come from leaders as they step down from their positions, not as they acquire them.  This is worth hearing every minute of.

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Electing Faithfulness: Concluding Thoughts

“Concluding Thoughts on Electing Faithfulness”
or
“Why should a foreigner like me care about this country?”
or
“I promise I’ll completely tone down the political postings for the next four years, but I ask that you to pay attention to this”

I am very much indebted the sermon I heard this Sunday by Frank Sullivan.  It reminded me that Christ is our hope and that it’s foolish to place our “trust in princes” whose plans come to an end and who’s power is but dust to God.
Sermon on Christ as our Hope
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Electing Faithfulness Part 10: About 5 More Issues to Examine

[back to part 9: Education]

“And other issues to consider”
or
“Issues I may not care less about, but am squeezing together for time’s sake”
or
“Ok, Caleb Coy, let’s hurry up and wrap this thing up—I gotta vote in like 3 days.”

So, remember how I’ve been going on about Ron Paul because I’m writing his name in even though he’s not running?  In this post I will get into things I disagree with him on, or am unsure about.  This post will also cover other issues I have yet to mention.  After this, I plan on having a final post to reflect on the whole experience before we all go and jump in those booths.  It may be that I have a post after that to reflect on the results, and I already know that no matter what I will be reminding us all not to panic, because Christ will still be King when it’s all over.
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Electing Faithfulness part 9: Our Future is the Hands of our Students

[back to part 8: The War on Some Drugs]

“Our Future is the Hands of our Students”
or
“High Stakes and Low Standards”
or
“High Standards, but Low Barriers”
or
“Repeal NCLB already!”

Our school systems rank toward the bottom of the list when compared with those of other industrialized countries.  Sure, we may be able to brag about churning out all kinds of Nobel winners and innovators, but most of our students are graduating without the knowledge they should have, meaning that those Nobel prize winners stand on the other side of a gap too far from most of our other students.  Our schools pass a lot of kids because our schools are too easy.
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Electing Faithfulness Part 8: The War on Some Drugs

[back to part 7: Healthcare]

“The War on Some Drugs”
or
“The War on Poor People Who Have Drugs”
or
“The War on Drugs Pharmaceutical Companies Aren’t Cashing In On”
or
“The War on Black People” (ok, that one’s harsh)

Take a brief look at what’s happening in America today:
Fully Armed Swat team shoots at ex-marine 71 Times in Marijuana raid—No Marijuana found
Marijuana raid kills father to be
And several other tragic drug war fatalities

In the simplest of terms, any substance that affects the body in a way that can impair a person is a drug, whether it be for medicine, recreation, or any other purpose.  Thus, the term “drug” is a neutral term.  However, we often hear about a so-called “war on drugs,” which is actually, if we apply it honestly, a war on particular drugs and for particular reasons, benefitting only particular people.

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Electing Faithfulness Part 7: Consult Your Doctor—The Health Care Issue

[back to part 6: Abortion]

“Consult Your Doctor”
or
“Big Bandaids and What To Do with Them”
or
“Man, do we have to talk about healthcare again?”

When the new Health Care bill was passed this past summer, I offered thoughts on that that you can view at the post: Big Bandaid.  Rather than revisit the entire post, I’ll recap some of the major points:

The teachings of the Christ are for us to take care of the poor and needy, and this combined with his miraculous healings stresses the importance of looking after the medical wellness of others (among the other things the miracles did, of course).  The examples of giving and caring shown by Christ and his followers in the New Testament demonstrate that the optimum way to do this is by individuals and communities actively caring for the “orphans and widows,” those society neglects.
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