A New Year, New Blog Goals

Last week, I published a satire article in Slackjaw: “I Thought I Would Give You A Call While Doing Every Obnoxiously Interruptive Thing I Can” in Slackjaw. This is one of many pieces I was able to get out last year, and it’s been the best year for publishing yet. So I decided to think through what to do about that.

photo credit: Jess Bailey https://unsplash.com/photos/q10VITrVYUM

I started this blog over a decade ago. At the time I went from thinking I would never do a blog to starting one up just to see where it went. In the meantime, my writing grew outside this blog.

While this blog serves its purpose, I am now transitioning to writing less on this blog, and more in other places. But I still want this blog to remain, as it does provide a unique space for my writing.

And so I intend to keep writing. From now on, you’ll see posts from me, but instead of seeing them on a two-week basis, I will be posting only monthly.

There will be some exceptions, quick posts here and there, but you can expect mostly posts from me. So keep following.

In addition, follow me on Medium. Last year I expanded to Medium, where I write mostly satire and advice on writing.

It’s been a journey so far readers. Let’s see where it leads next!

Yes, I Like “Rings of Power”

Look, I get the criticism. The creators of Rings of Power are playing fast and loose with lore: Gandalf shouldn’t be here yet, Galadriel is in Numenor for some reason, the rings are supposed to take much longer to make, and dwarves are singing to rocks.

I get that the timeline is off.

And to some extent I even sort of understand a part of you being ever so slightly wanting to scratch your head at the technicality of an elf having a skin color other than “fair.” After all, even Tolkein had a gene of bigotry that loved an imaginary Nordic race above all. (But we’ll come back to that.) Of course, it’s just as much canon to assume that elves have pointy ears, as this is said nowhere in any Tolkien book. Continue reading

New Personal Essay in Potomac Review

I just received my copy of issue 70 of Potomac Review. Some great poetry, essays, and short stories are included, as well as my latest essay, “In Maggie’s Shadow,” about my visit to a haunted plantation house and subsequently being stranded on a boat.

Order a copy here!

Here’s a preview:

You Can Listen To My Latest Story on Tall Tale TV

Readers, listen up!

Tall Tale TV is airing my latest urban fantasy story, “Butler and Barrie’s Wild Faery Land Stolen Child Carousel.”

You can listen to it on YouTube or as an MP3 podcast.

Don’t have time to read a story? Tall Tale TV publishes fantastical short stories as audio podcasts, the perfect length for your work commute, your dinner alone, or your putting yourself to bed at night. The site’s creator, Christopher Herron, has a bright, articulate voice perfect for pieces like mine. Many thanks to him.

Ernest Hemingway’s Lost Pickup Lines—published in Slackjaw

“We would be together and have our books and at night be warm in bed together with the windows open and the stars bright. If you give me your number.”

Hey readers. Ever wanted to read Ernest Hemingway’s lost pickup lines? Well now you can.

I just published the list in Slackjaw. Check it out here.

The Relevant Sting of John Grisham’s The Appeal—Book Review

There’s good beach reading and there’s bad beach reading. I found a copy of John Grisham’s The Appeal at a beach condo this year and elected to read it, having never heard about it before. While Grisham’s legal thrillers aren’t the most literary around, you can always count on them to be well researched and executed. This is no less true of his sprawling 2008 novel.

Continue reading

New Story in The Coachella Review

Hey readers, do you like murder mysteries? Well, I was totally into them before they were big.

Here’s a murder mystery that’s so obscure you’ve probably never heard of it.

You should check out “It Was The Hipster Who Done It,” my latest short story appearing in The Coachella Review. I mean, come on, it’s the perfect place for such a story to appear.

You can find it here.

See if you can solve the mystery. Not that I wanna dragoon you into it.

Ozark is a Rural, Modern Gatsby

I think the creators of the Netflix hit show Ozark borrowed from a famous hundred-year-old novel.

I realized this as I came to the last episode of Ozark. The story is sort of a rural, modern Gatsby tale. I mean, if you always understood Fitzgerald’s masterpiece to be about the American Dream and not just a love story.

Continue reading