A Spectrum of Shepherding Child’s Heart

After reading a book in a parenting class called Shepherding a Child’s Heart by Tedd Tripp, I concluded that his own parents must have been obsessive compulsive, since their last name ended with a double p, their son’s first name had to end with a double d.

More importantly, I learned a valuable model for identifying different parenting types. Tripp’s major thesis is that parenting—which is what he means by shepherding a child’s heart—is all about shaping. Continue reading

Week People—a poem

[The following poem was originally published in Versewrights.]

WEEK PEOPLE

Monday morning hates his job
a case of himself
saying hi to Bob in the hall
who says hey back to him in the hall.
The coffee percolates, drips
a long day inaugurates a long week
and it all goes downhill from there.

Meet the sisters of the arch:
Fat Tuesday, Hump Wednesday, Thirsty Thursday
drinking martinis round a table every afternoon
and sleep heavy that evening
after they hang up the phone
full of the day’s daily review.

Friday announces herself
steals the show
is twenty-three years old and
addicted to coke.

Saturday morning wakes up late
does not remember Friday or
what he did to her.
He sits in the house all day in his socks
when he’s not running marathons
or out of town.

Sunday afternoon is an old Brit sleeping
in a musty armchair
a wooden cross hung limply on the wall behind him
a glass of brandy forming condensation by his side
as he snores
the game blaring on the telly.

13 Things Romans 13:1 Doesn’t Say

Romans 13:1 is an oft-quoted passage in Christian scriptures. A small sentence nestled in the middle of a powerful letter from Paul the Apostle to a church in Rome, these few words have been taken to mean a lot of things they simply could not mean in the context of the letter, Paul’s other letters, the entire body of New Covenant scripture, or the whole Bible. Continue reading

Government Shutdowns, Amnesia, and Blame

 

Winston Churchill is often quoted as having said, “We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out.”

How true that is. The words we say sometimes become the words we must later eat. If they turn out to be true, they must apply to us. If they turn out to be false, then we are proven false. Either way, our words we must eat.

This weekend the American public witnessed a government shutdown, the first in 5 years. This is the first time in U.S. history that a government shutdown has occurred while the White House, Senate, and House of Reps. all being controlled by a single party. The shutdown is still ongoing. Continue reading

Butler’s Parable of the Sower: Your Walls Won’t Keep You Safe

When I read Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower in preparation for John Green’s latest season of Crash Course: Literature, I was first drawn by the Biblical parallel in the title. In what way was this going to be like the parable of the sower? Continue reading

The Year’s Hit Posts in 2017

A look back on the previous year, and here are some of the top hit posts:

Cormac McCarthy Narrates Minecraft
famed author of No Country For Old Men reviews the game

Why the Civil War Happened
an in-depth analysis

Will the Religious Right Wake Up on the Right Side of the Bed?
an op-ed in the Warblr Continue reading