Today’s Featured Series: Jesus and the Eyewitnesses—A Study with a Skeptic

Readers, we are in day 3 of our blog series features week.

Today I wanted to feature a series I did on a book I read with a skeptic friend of mine called Jesus and the Eyewitnesses by Richard Bauckham. It was a thick, book, a long study, and lots of time to think about Gospel.512b4u1bmhol._sx335_bo1204203200_

Jesus and the Eyewitnesses—A Study with a Skeptic
1. The Study Begins
2. History, Jesus, and the Holocaust
3. Papias, Papias, and more Papias
4. Names of Witnesses
5. The Twelve
6. Inclusio-“From the Beginning
7. The Gospel of Mark
8. John the Beloved
9. Is Oral Tradition Trustworthy?
10. Testimony and Memory
11. Transmitting the Jesus of Testimony
12. Conclusion and Reflection

Gleanings from Clement of Corinth

The Letter of Clement to the Christians in Corinth is probably the earliest Christian writing we have outside of the Gospel canon.  The letter mainly dealt with a scandal in which shepherds (aka elders, bishops, presbyters) had been tossed out by a younger generation without good reason.  It’s a well-known letter to Christians today, but it gives us a great insight into early Christian history and culture.  Here are some gleanings from the letter:
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_A Faith Not Worth Fighting For_ Review: A Closure of Thoughts


“You can kill us, but you cannot hurt us.” -Justin Martyr
“The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church.”-Tertullian
*Matthew 5:9; 5:38-45; 26:52; Luke 6:27-28; Romans 12:14; 12:17-21; 1 Cor. 4:12; 1 Peter 3:9; and Revelation 12:11

Having finished the book A Faith Not Worth Fighting For, I have one wish, that it was instead called A Faith Worth Not Fighting For.  I think that phrase is more positive and more accurately reflects the essays within.  The Christian faith is something I will fight for in my heart and in the endeavors of my faith, not with weapons, but with the piercing sword of the spirit that gives new life.  Here the authors explain why they chose the title they did, which I think is justified.
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